Am reading Sin Tetas after seeing the telenovela. Was interested in the part where they talk about excessive and lavish fincas built by successful capos - one who built a scale White House, one whose finca exactly copied a Cali social club after being refused admission, etc. Is there any truth to these stories, or similar intersting fincas built by those with the money to do whatever they wanted?

Posted on October 2, 2007


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If I ever move to Colombia, I'm going to build a house made out of chicharrones.

Posted on October 2, 2007


yep, some are wonderful, Pablo Escobar finca even had a zoo with very exotic animals. I wonder what happen to the Animals, but the farm now is in a very sad state

I watched on the news when I was in Colombia the finca of that narcotrafficker Chupeta, it has a lake with those water speed motorcycles , a huge swimming pool many of the rooms have expensive Marmol.
That guy had soo much money!!!!

one finca on the way to Pto Lopez it's like a mansion, it was on the market for 1,500.000.000 i don't know if i got it right but it's mil quinientos millones de pesos!!!!


MT i would not recommend to do the house out of chicharrones specially if you move to a hot city


use recycle materials, buy lots of gaseosas litro, you know the ones no retornables plastic bottles

i saw a guy that filledl them with sand and they became very heavy, and instead of using bricks he used the bottles!

Posted on October 2, 2007


I gather the animals in Escobar's zoo were shot.

Nobody wanted/could afford to keep them.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Arturo Durazo Moreno a mexican "politician" had a finca where built a scale of the Parthenon and according to an article, he had lots of extravagant things, his toilet for example, was made of gold... and had a zoo also...

This is not a legend... since one of the most important political magazines in Mexico published some pics.

Posted on October 2, 2007


MT, the late Chepe Santacruz (Cali cartel honcho in the late 8s and early 90s) after he was denied admission (even after offering bribes) to the Club Colombia in Cali, built a replica of it in Ciudad Jardin in the south and was always throwing lavish parties. After he was killed (in Bogota I believe, sorry Rubi) it sat abandoned and ha since been looted and only the shell remains.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Kalder, Pablo's hippos are still roaming his former farm , Hacienda Napoles, no zoo wanted them as it was too expensive to fly them. They now roam the area and raise general havoc.

Posted on October 2, 2007


I can just imagine un kiosko made of plastic bottles. LOL

Posted on October 2, 2007


If I had a finca made of chicharrón Elmo would eat me out of house and home :(

Posted on October 2, 2007


Hey talking about Elmo and eating, do you think that grizzly bear finally got a hold of a guajiro quarter pounder with cheese?

Posted on October 2, 2007


"This might be my very last post, on Friday I??m heading off on a fishing adventure to the wild woods of northern USA bordering with Canada. Last time there I almost ended up bear dinner. The grizzly chased my ass around like I was a fokin Quarter Pounder with cheese" - Elmo.

Posted on October 2, 2007


there we are polo a house made of plastic bottles

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Posted on October 2, 2007


LOL kat, this guy is pretty creative I just hope he's not a smoker.

Posted on October 2, 2007


if you drive around just outside bogotá, at least near the alpina dairy, you can see some pretty outlandish houses perched up in the hills.

Didn't notice a fake white house, but a few looked close to that style. A lot of modern mansions too.

Wouldn't having a house like that draw a wee bit of attention from somebody?

Posted on October 2, 2007


If you see a country house in Colombia in a neo-roman style, you can bet it belongs to a traqueto.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Colombia's poor inherit drug estates
President Alvaro Uribe has accelerated a program that redistributes prime land confiscated from narcotraffickers.

By Rachel Van Dongen | Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor

LA DORADA, COLOMBIA ??
Sandra Betancur used to work for drug lord Jairo Correa Alzate on his sprawling ranch in this hot, fertile corner of central Colombia. Now she's close to owning the very land that once belonged to the lanky capo, who was killed eight years ago. "We didn't have anything and now we have a lot," says Ms. Betancur, who lives here with her 4-year-old daughter.
Colombia, like many South American countries, is a nation of economic extremes. Less than 1 percent of the population owns 60 percent of the land. Now the government has reinvigorated a program that gives land seized from millionaire drug dealers to the poor - in effect, tearing a page from the Marxist playbook. While leftist rebels have been waging war for 40 years in the name of the disadvantaged, conservative President Alvaro Uribe's program is undercutting a main plank in their platform.

"This would be the magic solution," says Alejandro Reyes, a former professor at Bogotá's National University, who has studied the geography of Colombia's war and faced five death threats because of his work. "But that solution is very difficult."


As head of Terra Co-op Ltd., Betancur is one of 76 families who have been given the right to work Mr. Correa's former estate, situated on 1,726 acres of prime farmland off the highway between Bogotá and Medellín. As the first beneficiaries of a land-distribution program under Mr. Uribe, they plan to milk cattle, install a fishpond for tourists, and grow passion fruit and lemons. If they do a good job, the government might award them permanent title to the property after five years.

Statistics about how much land belongs to narcotraffickers are nearly impossible to come by. Mr. Reyes estimates that as many as 9.8 million of Colombia's 111 million acres of arable land could belong to drug lords. In his two years in office, Uribe has seized 30,000 acres and turned over 24,846 of them to the poor and displaced victims of the Colombian conflict. The government is currently examining another 738,000 acres for possible transfer. That's compared to 12 properties given to a single family in the previous 12 years.

"The lands are the best - they are fertile and very well located. This is the redistributive process that the country is waiting for," says Agriculture Minister Carlos Gustavo Cano.

The government is also planning other uses for the confiscated property, including solving the country's prison shortage. Uribe recently announced that "Naples," the 7,000-acre ranch of infamous drug lord Pablo Escobar in Antioquia state, would be used for a new jail, despite protests by local authorities.

According to Diego Zubieta, a top official at the National Institute of Rural Development,under Uribe 90 farms confiscated by the National Drug Directorate (DNE) are in the process of being evaluated for the program, and 20 have been donated to a total of 130 families. Mr. Zubieta says that once a property has been selected, the national and local governments hold a lottery to choose the land's new owners. Priority is given to the poorest applicants, along with those with some farming expertise.

But the program is already beset with problems at all levels. Last month, DNE director Col. Alfonso Plazas was forced to resign under accusations of corruption and mismanagement of properties. Betancur says the government transferred the property to her without giving the farmers credit for buying cattle or seed. And the new owners aren't allowed to build anything on the property - they can only renovate - and they are having a hard time getting credit because they don't have permanent title to the land.

"The problem is [we don't know] who it belongs to," says Oscar Cardona, agriculture adviser to La Dorada's mayor.

Another problem is selecting who exactly should get the land - locals resent when poor people from outside the area are given the land. And many estates are caught up in endless legal procedures, often having to do with the legality of the confiscation.

In the case of "Naples," it was seized 16 years ago but only officially became government property in July. For now it is the property of Puerto Triunfo, a sleepy town on the Magdalena River.

But the ranch is in ruins: looters have destroyed the main house in search of treasure buried in the walls and floors; trees grow in what was once a luxury bathtub; and the drug baron's famous collection of some 500 exotic animals - including African pelicans, miniature donkeys, and Malayan tapirs - is gone, except for 11 hippos who frolic in the 12 man-made lakes. Life-size replicas of dinosaurs dot the property, and a private company is renovating the large airstrip.

Luis Francisco Santos, director of Puerto Triunfo's environmental agency, says the community would like to use the drug lord's property to generate jobs by setting up fish farms and a crocodile nursery. The national government considered creating a museum of crime but settled on building a jail.

The debate has left the six displaced families living on the land in legal limbo. Meanwhile, Mr. Santos accuses the residents of stealing some of the ranch's assets and says that giving such properties to the poor will never work.

"It isn't a solution to give away land. Unfortunately in our culture we're not prepared for land reform. The people [would rather] have the money in their pockets," he says.

Posted on October 2, 2007


"Wouldn't having a house like that draw a wee bit of attention from somebody?"

In Monteria you can take a tour of Mafiosa houses. Kind of like a Beverly Hills tour. Everybody knows where they live and who they are.

Posted on October 2, 2007


"yep, some are wonderful, Pablo Escobar finca even had a zoo with very exotic animals. I wonder what happen to the Animals, but the farm now is in a very sad state." Kat1

Pablo Escobar's old finca will be reopened to the public next month. From my understanding the hippos are still part of the little private zoo.

Also, just returned from Medellin and was invited to a few former narcos fincas and all I can say is INCREDIBLY BEAUTIFUL!!

There was this one with water park attractions, a lake with padel boats and row boats, the home is converted into a hotel with a balcony overlooking a large swimming pool down below, next to a bar at the center along with several tables next to the pool for eating and drinking.

I was completely blown away at how beautiful the place was set up.

Thinking about staying there at least one night on my next trip.

Posted on October 2, 2007


excuse me... a stupid question...

what is the purpose of reopening Pablo Escobar's house to the public?

Posted on October 2, 2007


Gabo the name alone attract plenty of visitor, im pretty sure some one is cashing in on this.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Not to mention the employment it creates for the locals.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Plus plenty of people are still curious...

Posted on October 2, 2007


I personally see it as $$$$$$... yeah Polo you're right it attracts a lot of people...

But thanks to that man (in part) Colombia is considered what is considered around the world (you may like it or not) only few lucky who really have visited Colombia know what is all about.

Now my question is shall we be proud of that "very nice" finca?

;)

Posted on October 2, 2007


I agree completely Gabo... he did helped tarnish colombia's name, however there are still people who are curious as to how pablo escobar really lived. As far as my opinion on him, Personally, he got what he had coming to him.

Posted on October 2, 2007


yeah Polo the other day one of my friends told me she watched a documentary about him, my friend told me that at the end of it, appeared Pablo's sister saying that when he was shot she got close to his body and thanked him for the beautiful human being he had been "y lo bueno que había sido"....

My friend (who is not even Colombian) said... "no sabía que matar tanta gente inocente era característica de seres humanos tan hermosos" and I agree with her.

Ahora algunos propios y extraños vistarán esa casa por curiosidad y los extraños ingenuos, pensarán que es una parte chévere de la historia de Colombia.... lo lujoso no se lo quita

disculpen lo cansón de un servidor, pero me parece, triste y lamentable que esa parte de la historia de Colombia dé de comer a los lugareños, finalmente es parte no podemos ocultarla, porque existió y seguimos padeciendo y sufriendo las consecuencias...

Posted on October 2, 2007


Gabo I totally hear you. It just pisses me off to see how some people refuse to put that shit behind. For the most part, these 'lavish' houses were not even tasteful or elegant...I mean gold doorknobs and crystal rock mirrors on the ceiling is not my idea of "beautiful" let alone "classy". Tacky rococo has been out of date for decades...thank god!!!!
I would not pay a cent to see anyof these places, i think is a lack of respect to the country. Colombia is just trying to put that stuff in the past, what kind of idiot would come up with such a humiliating idea? opening up a house built at the expense of an entire country? Give me a break. There are plenty of young artists who deserve more attention than a criminal's legacy.

Posted on October 2, 2007


I can certainly understand anyone's revulsion by Escobar and his kind. But I can also easily understand why people would want to see how the guy lived. How often does one get to tour the home of a multi-billionaire criminal? Especially if he had crappy taste in interior decor! jajajajja

All countries have bad people and places in their history. Al Capone's home is Chicago is on several tours of the city. The Texas School Book Depository get visitors all the time. Call it morbid, or whatever you want to- people are curious about famous criminals, etc.

My guess is that anyone who is stupid enough to equate Escobar with typical Colombians today are too provincial, or just downright dumb, to travel to Colombia, anyway. He's a part of Colombia's history though, like it or not. When anyone questions me about security in Colombia, or anything similar, Escobar is the benchmark I use to talk about how different it is today, for the tourist, how much better it is today. To ignore that part of Colombia's history would only seem like a vast denial conspiracy.

Posted on October 2, 2007


CK -- "I would not pay a cent to see anyof these places, i think is a lack of respect to the country. Colombia is just trying to put that stuff in the past, what kind of idiot would come up with such a humiliating idea? opening up a house built at the expense of an entire country? Give me a break."

I see your point, CK, though I disagree. A great many of the most famous monuments were built with slave labour, or by a moneyed elite splashing obscene amounts of cash while the general population was only barely clinging to life. By that logic, the Pyramids of Egypt, Taj Mahal, Palace of Versailles, Neuschwannstein and everything the Catholic Church ever built come into question.

In a way, I think it's a kind of justice. Pablo's family had to leave Colombia as refugees. Meanwhile, while Pablo is buried six feet under, the hoi polloi is gonna be trudging through his old domain, with nothing more than a sense of mild curiosity about how the other half lived.

I would sooner pay for a visit to that finca than pay for a Ciudad Perdida trek. On the trek, you're indirectly paying paras for protection and taking photos of a cocaine factory, all so you can send it to your mates back home in their office jobs to show how hardcore a traveller you are.

Posted on October 2, 2007


"gabolicious says on Thursday October 4th, 2007 6:18:

I personally see it as $$$$$$... yeah Polo you're right it attracts a lot of people...

But thanks to that man (in part) Colombia is considered what is considered around the world (you may like it or not) only few lucky who really have visited Colombia know what is all about.

Now my question is shall we be proud of that "very nice" finca?"

HELL YES!!

Remember, which is to say don't forget... "From Fear To Hope."

Regardless of what anyone thinks about this, it is definitely going to be a positive thing for Colombia altogether. Those who ignore the past are sure to repeat it. This also happened in Chicago, New York, Italy, amongst other places on this planet.

I have just started reading "Killing Pablo" and so far find his life story to be very interesting to say the least. See you all at the grand opening!!

Who's with me?

Posted on October 2, 2007


Pedro, don't forget the Tower of London, that should come down also :)

Posted on October 2, 2007


And London Bridge too. Wait, I think that's already falling down.

Posted on October 2, 2007


no guys... I think you are confusing things... I am not saying: "forget the past" just simply saying: "let's move on"... If you read a book about Escobar, I expect that you consider the guy: SMART you can't be a duro with a small brain and small balls.

Good for you Medellin Traveler that you want to go to that "very nice" finca, sorry but I would not do it... that is my Colombian point of view... some of my relatives suffered the lost of friends thanks to that guy. If you are a foreigner and want to know that part of the history... nice of you, cause you will not be another foreigner thinking that all colombians are narcotraficantes.

Posted on October 2, 2007


This thread was not meant to judge the morality of trafficking or the cultural and historical meaning of criminal organizations.

But since Sin Tetas did seem to refer specifically to Cali's Club Colombia I was wonderin whether the other examples there were true. Guess no one recalls the White House one. Newspapers tend to focus on the fact so and so was captured and do not provide interesting details. But here is an article about Pablo's hippos.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20060819.ESCOBAR19/TPStory/specialTravel

Posted on October 2, 2007


MT, I read about the white house example in an article where the writer obviously had never set foot in Colombia and was describing in all details The Club Colombia copy and calling it a copy of the white house. That's what happens when people write about places they've never seen.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Thanks, billyb. Was wondering where the rumour started.

Posted on October 2, 2007


"I see your point, CK, though I disagree. A great many of the most famous monuments were built with slave labour, or by a moneyed elite splashing obscene amounts of cash while the general population was only barely clinging to life. By that logic, the Pyramids of Egypt, Taj Mahal, Palace of Versailles, Neuschwannstein and everything the Catholic Church ever built come into question"

Pedro I think that isnt a fair comparison, although i do see your point. However, slavery, class disparity etc were regarded as part of the status quo at the time. It was not illegal to have slaves, it was part of the modus vivendi...yes, we now see it as a despicable practice but at the time, these practices enjoyed some degree of legitimacy. Escobar on the other hand was a criminal, killing, trafficking and acting against the law for nothing other than self profit. He terrorised a nation and his legacy is very recent still...if someone decides to revive his infamous glory in a 100 years then awesome, good for them. But I find it terribly disrespectful towards people who were orphaned or kidnapped thanks to this monster...most of them are still alive.
I think its a matter of not contributing to the humiliation of people who are already victims. And even if the people who are charging said "ok, the money collected will go to a peace fun" or whatever, still its not good enough. Its too fresh...I am not ready to see escobar's legacy as a major tourist attraction in Colombia and I am sure many people feel exactly the same.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Good or bad, Escobar is part of the history of Colombia, ignoring it will not make it go away. Better to teach about it and hopefully it can be avoided in the future. You don't see the English pretending that Henry VIII never existed and his former homes, Hampton Court and the Tower are major tourist attractions.

Posted on October 2, 2007


yes but Herny VIII was the establishment. Pablo escobar wasn't...I am not saying ignore it...hell no. Im just saying take it for what it is, something that needs to be left six feet under.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Pablo was a congressman, that's establishment.

Posted on October 2, 2007


In addition to the above...in some of the poorer barrios a LOT of paisas remember Pablo as someone who helped the poor.

t

Posted on October 2, 2007


CK... that is my girl!!!! jajajajajajajajaja

That's why I love you!!!

=)

Posted on October 2, 2007


FINCAS , ha, I live in a place ( its not mine I babysit it for a friend you understand) in cali, close to sexta ( as if you dont know) its preposterous, massive, pretentious,pompous, pool, fountain in the living room ( well i'd call it a ballroom) lookout tower, torture cubicles, no stop thats just me, gulp, but you dont have to go into them thar hills to get close to the real deal, comprenden, BUT its ok now. I digress, . My english spelling is getting worse , now that would not be to bad if my spanish was improving , the proof is in the pudding, mm with custard.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Gabo you'll sell you soul for a pretty face? :))

Posted on October 2, 2007


I've already sold my soul to rock and roll, haaaaaaaaaaa what did I get in return, polite aplause, aahh never again............ wheres my guitar, aahh here you are niña, tranquila,. SMOKE ON THE WATER, riff merchants stand up now and take the respect you deserve,

Posted on October 2, 2007


He was not one when the avianca airplane exploded in the air, he was not a congressperson when Lara Bonilla was murdered, or when he bombed the DAS building... This person was a blatant criminal, so comparisons with Henry VIII in my opinion are out of the question.

If someone wants to go spend their money and time at Hacienda Napoles then good for them, but I feel Colombia has a lot more to offer than Drugs, death, and everything that comes with it. If those in charge of the project are going to show Escobar for the monster he was, just like Hitler is shown everywhere, then I would consider changing my opinion. But, personally, Id never set foot in there.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Myself, I think crimes against humanity are still crimes that should be punished whether they were commited by a king or a narco kingpin. BTW, this is what it will be used for in part.

"The Colombian government, which seized Napoles from Escobar's exiled wife and children, will begin breaking up the property into smaller lots next month. Part of the ranch is intended for a prison housing 1,200 inmates, and there are plans for an anti-crime museum "

Posted on October 2, 2007


(la campina, reading your posts, it always causes headache to me....robi666)

La Campiña....OTOH...it provides some of us with that deep belly laughter we all so much need for better health ;)

Posted on October 2, 2007


Billy I would agree with you, essentially, crimes against humanity are what they are regardless of who is committing them. Except of course if you are comparing the XX century mentality, (with human rights, international courts etc etc) to the XVI century, when there was no notion of such thing. Both are very different contexts, different times and mentality... judging both under the same perspective is very misleading.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Yeah, but i have a feeling that those people being tortured and having their heads axed in the Tower of London by Hank's henchmen, somehow still thought that what was happening to them was wrong.

Posted on October 2, 2007


BILLY B , JUST TO LET YOU GUYS KNOW. nor MT nor you r right about the "club colombia" house. Although i've seen you have done your research the truth is none of the above. I am from Cali and I was lucky enough to meet the man himself (Don Chepe).Actually I am a close friend of the Santacruz family.Let me tell you, for your info that was a bunch of crap some american journalists wrote in the 80's and after the article was published some people in Colombia an the US started actually to believe in it and then other journalists wrote it as a fact. The real story however is.Don Chepe bought this property for his family back in 1977. Construction started in 78'. It is true it was one of the biggest mansions in Colombia but he never tried to join Club Colombia, he was never interested. The house did not portray the white house nor club colombia. He did like club Colombia beer however.The mansion was detroyed in 92' because Mr. santacruz wanted a bigger one so that his 4 younger children would have their own room(space). This second house (" sat abandoned and ha since been looted and only the shell remains" that is accurate Billy B) was never completed because Santacruz was assasinated by rival Norte del Valle Cartel in a meeting in Medellin in March 1996. He was betrayed by Carlos Castanio (head of paramilitary group @ the time) THESE ARE ALL FACTS FROM AN INSIDER.

Posted on October 2, 2007


Pablo wasn't a 'full' congressman, he was something like an 'alternate.' As for the Hacienda Naples, someone could Google this, but I'm pretty sure the Colombian government is reopening it as a tourist attraction. The wandering hippos periodically make the news, too.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacienda_Napoles
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A0CE3DF1230F931A35755C0A9659C8B63&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

Posted on October 2, 2007