HEY EVERYBODY, I JUST WANNA GET SOME INFO ON HOW I CAN BECOME A COLOMBIAN CITIZEN FROM THE USA...I CURRNETLY LIVE IN BOSTON,MA AREA. MY MOTHER WAS A CITIZEN 9BEING BORN THERE0 THEY SAY THIS MIGHT FACILITATE THINGS FOR ME AN OBTAINING A CITIZENSHIP....CAN ANYONE PROVIDE HELP?

Posted on June 24, 2008


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Contact the Colombian embassy. I am sure they can help you.

Posted on June 24, 2008


What you have to go is go to the Colombian embassy. They will start the entire process there.

Posted on June 24, 2008


You have to eat a lot of arepas and morcillas, and I think you actually have to live in the country for at least 3 years

Posted on June 24, 2008


To make the advice three times, contact the closest Colombian Consulate. If your mother has the necessary paper work, principally a notarized copy of her Colombian birth certificate it is a relatively painless process will have to go with your Colombian parent to the Colombian consulate. They will apply for a "registro civil" (register) naming you as their child. You will need an official copy of your Colombian parent(s) birth certificate to provide proof of Colombian citizenship.

Once you get an official copy of your registro civil, you can request a cedula, which is Colombia's official identification card given to all citizens over the age of 18. You will be issued a contrasena first, which is a temporary cedula while your name is investigated through DAS. With this contrasena you can apply for a Colombian passport. You will probably not get your official cedula for at least a year. The passport is a lot faster, usually you can receive it within 24 hours.

You do not have to be domiciled in Colombia to claim and receive citizenship.

Posted on June 24, 2008


Sorry, I "skipped" that part about your mom being a national...
But you still to have to eat incredible amounts of arepas and morcillas though

Posted on June 24, 2008


Gator
thanks for the info that is correct

i tried last May IN Colombia and what a headache not possible

Posted on June 24, 2008


my mother was born in la pena, colombia and I was born in NY, yes already went to the colombian embassy and they said everything has to be notarized in the US ( apostille) make sure your birth certificate is up to date as well as your parents. there is an office in NY

Posted on June 24, 2008


wow...thanks for all the helpful info...i appreciate it very much...THANKSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

Posted on June 24, 2008


jorgegdiaz says on Jun 24, 2008, 18:16: flag

You have to eat a lot of arepas and morcillas, and I think you actually have to live in the country for at least 3 years


Ah bueno pues! I failed...I don't eat morcillas...

Posted on June 24, 2008


Where do you Live Now ? I really don't thank it will be hard to do perviding your not running from the Police......Are You?

Posted on June 24, 2008


Interesting. What if one has a Colombian passport, can this facilitate obtaining citizenship?

Plato

Posted on June 24, 2008


Uh, let me explain.

My father got me one of those old Colombian Passports in the 1970s, you know, the old green ones? Well, I have to renew it but can I get Colombian citizenship with it?

Plato

Posted on June 24, 2008


If you have/had a Colombian passport you are a Colombian national. If you still have the passport go the closest consulate and get a new one. You do NOT get a Colombian passport without being a citizen of Colombia,

Posted on June 24, 2008


Wow . . . didn't know that (duuuuhhhhhh!). Well, I have dual (U.S. and Colombia ) citizenship and didn't even know it.

Born in the USA but my parents were born in Colombia. Under those rules, I guess that's how I got my Colombian passport.

Thanks Gator. I'll check with the Colombian consulate.

Plato

Posted on June 24, 2008


ColombianoGringo,

Thanks a lot! That's heartening news. Yes, there has to be a "Registro Civil de Nacimiento." since my father filed it years ago. It makes perfect sense. Thanks again.

Plato

P.S. Just checked the Colombian Constitution. Its says:

Artículo 96 de la Constitución Política

3. CRITERIOS PARA ADQUIRIR LA NACIONALIDAD

La Constitución aplica la combinación de tres criterios para determinar la nacionalidad colombiana por nacimiento: El Ius Sanguinis, con el cual se obtiene el derecho de acceder a una nacionalidad en virtud de la nacionalidad que ostentan los padres; Ius Soli, por el cual se obtiene el derecho a la nacionalidad en consideración al lugar de nacimiento y el Ius Domicili, en virtud del cual se accede a la nacionalidad por el domicilio.

En el numeral 1 literal a) del artículo 96 de la Constitución Política, se exige una de dos condiciones para ser nacional colombiano: que el padre o la madre hayan sido naturales o nacionales colombianos o que, siendo hijos de extranjeros, alguno de sus padres estuviere domiciliado en la República al momento del nacimiento.

El domicilio se entiende como la residencia con el ánimo de permanecer en el territorio nacional, de acuerdo con lo establecido en el artículo 76 del Código Civil.

Con el Acto Legislativo No. 1 del 25 de enero del 2002, que reforma el artículo 96 de la Constitución Política, se introduce un aspecto nuevo en el numeral 1 literal b, como es el hecho, que el hijo de padre o madre colombiano nacido en el exterior que luego se domicilie en Colombia o que se registre en una oficina consular de la República, se considera nacional colombiano por nacimiento, en este sentido el criterio que prima es el Ius Sanguinis (hijo de colombiano nacido en el exterior)

Visto lo anterior, los hijos de padre o madre colombianos nacidos en el exterior, que con posterioridad se domicilien en territorio colombiano, al momento de levantar el acta de nacimiento en cualquier notaria del Círculo de Bogotá, la exigencia de la prueba del domicilio, sigue vigente y, por el contrario para los hijos de padre o madre colombianos que nazcan en el exterior, con el solo hecho del registro en el respectivo consulado colombiano de la República, la prueba del domicilio no será exigida.

En conclusión son dos eventos diferentes por los cuales se puede adquirir la nacionalidad colombiana por nacimiento en el caso del literal b) de artículo 96 de la Constitución Política.

Posted on June 24, 2008


I am reviving this thread cause I have an additional question....I am in the process of trying to get colombian citizenship as my mother is a citizen. She doesn't have a cedula because she came year as a teenager (before 18). Question - Do I have to wait until she gets a cedula before I can apply for my citizenship? OR can I just go and register with her and her birth certificate? Second Q - Once I register, does that mean I am a citizen and then I can apply for a cedula?

Thanks for any help. I have a paper with the information, but it is in spanish. My spanish is good, but limited and I don't want to confuse myself.

Posted on June 24, 2008


bumpppp

Posted on June 24, 2008