Just wanted to share my experience with you as it might be very helpful for the rest of you to know....

This week I went to the MRE to change my "entidad" where I am a "Docente". I took along the contract, prop certificate, needed letters, business certificates, etc for my new school that have always been needed in the past to legally work. Well, THINGS HAVE CHANGED!!! The MRE no longer needs all these papers for us to work legally in Colombia. :) In order to work MOST jobs in Colombia all you need to do is provide the following:

- Passport
- 2 pics (3x3 cm with white background)
- Copy of all used pages in your passport
- Application for the visa
- A form that promises you will inform DAS of your activity changes (MRE has copies of this, you just sign it)
- $40 USD (paid in pesos)

That is it! It is that simple and then they will change your occupation on your visa to say: "Hogar y/o Estudiante / Independiente y para ser contratado(a)" and the "entidiad" will then become "todas". So with these type of visas you can basically carry out any normal activity legally. There is one exception though. With this change you are still prohibited from working professional jobs such as law, medicine, engineering, etc. Teaching (even at the University level) is not considered professional according to the MRE. For professional types of work you will have to go through the hassle of getting the MRE to approve it. So now, I am just expected to inform DAS if I want to work at multiple places at the same time, if I want to change employers, etc. Hope you find this helpful.

Additional info:
Conforme a lo establecido en los parágrafos Primero y Segundo del articulo 12 de la Resolución 4700 de 2009: ??El extranjero cónyuge o compañero(a) permanente de nacional colombiano(a) quedará autorizado(a) con esta Visa para ocupación: Hogar y/o Estudiante / Independiente y/o para ser contratado, previo cumplimiento de las normas que regulen la materia y para lo cual deberá diligenciar y firmar el formulario de ??Compromiso de informar al Departamento Administrativo de Seguridad, DAS?

PARÁGRAFO SEGUNDO.- En todos los casos, cuando se trate de ejercer profesión regulada, el extranjero requiere estar autorizado en la visa de manera específica y para el efecto deberá cumplir con los mismos requisitos consagrados en las normas vigentes que se exigen para los nacionales colombianos. El extranjero aportará ante la Oficina encargada de la expedición de visas los documentos que le permitan el ejercicio de la profesión regulada, tal como la homologación o convalidación del título profesional, el permiso o licencia provisional para ejercer, o la matrícula o tarjeta profesional.?

Con base en lo anterior, con el diligenciamiento y presentación del formulario de Compromiso de informar al Departamento Administrativo de Seguridad, Departamento Administrativo de Seguridad D.A.S (SC-FO-07) el titular de la visa TEMPORAL CONYUGE (TC) queda facultado para ejercer múltiples actividades.

Posted on January 7, 2010


You might also like:

Comments:

Thanks for that

Posted on January 7, 2010


Adrienne,
So, you got all this done in Bogota? I will also have to change my visa however, I will no longer be a teacher but a Director of an Insititute that is nation wide. Is that position consider a professional? I was also hoping to get a residence visa. I currently have a visa Padre de hija Colombiana. The requirements state that you need to have had this visa for 3 years, but I have only had mine for 2 years. They could have given me 3 years but they did not. I have been in Colombia for almost 4 years. I paid the penalty for the over stay. Do you have any information on my situation? It would be much appreciatd. Oh, congrats on your new position.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Philly, I don't know the answers to any of your questions. Sorry. Congrats to you the same!

Posted on January 7, 2010


Oh but yes, it was in Bogota at the MRE.

Posted on January 7, 2010


A proffessional position are those regulated by law, positions which one needs a license for, i.e. lawyer (Decreto 196 de 1971), physician and health related, some engineering fields and related (Leyes 18 de 1976, 20 de 1984, 51 de 1986 y 842 de 2003), dentist (Ley 10 de 1962, Ley 52 de 1964.), bacteriologists, veterinarian, Optometritian )Decreto 825 de 1954), journalist ( Ley 51 de 1975), and accountant (Ley 145 de 1960).

A position such as "rector" (principal for the public school system) requieres a college degree and 6 years of teaching experience.

Congrats on your post, btw.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Really good info Adrienne I'm in this position so it's very relevant I'm going for the residency soon as I've been here for 4 years thanks Alan.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Philly re "I was also hoping to get a residence visa. I currently have a visa Padre de hija Colombiana"

Not sure what a visa Padre de hija Colombiana is but in november I was going to renew my visa conjugal but as my son was born here (in Bogotá) in november I simply waited until he was born then the following week went in to the MRE and got my residency visa. If you are in the same boat then there's no hoping about it you are entitled to it. Granted the residency visa is expensive USD160 but it's indefinite, so no renewal costs.

Hope this helps

Posted on January 7, 2010


Noelito40,
What papers did you need? How long have you been in the country? Was that your first visa?

Posted on January 7, 2010


1. Can this be done in Medellin?
2. Can I apply for this VISA directly upon arrival or do I have to go through the 'novio, or other step?

I would like to apply for a work VISA upon arrival in Medellin.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Very useful info, Adrienne79 - many thanks!

Am I right to understand, though, that in your case, you ALREADY got a work visa as a "docente" in Colombia and that you simply wanted to change the "entitad" (the company) where you wanted to teach?

In other words, you already had a work visa and that you simply wanted to inform the MRE of your new school? If so, that would be quite different from obtaining a new work visa from scratch...

Posted on January 7, 2010


I have a TC visa (spouse visa) not a work visa. This doesn't apply at all to a work visa only to the type of visas I listed in the title of this post. Yes, I was previously working but that doesn't matter. Even if my visa had still said "hogar" and I went in with all the papers ready to change it, they still wouldn't have needed them. This is very new from my understanding. In fact, I was just there doing it in September and they still took all the papers and specified my place of employment. Even last week on the phone they were telling me I needed all the papers when I called to verify the process.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Many thanks Adrienne! That is REALLY useful to know.

As you wrote, this must be a direct consequence of "Decreto 2622 - 2009) which aimed at simplifying procedures.

I already got my "Visa de conyuge" and have wasted lots of time trying to change my employment situation.

My new employer in Barranquilla, who were nevertheless ready to do all the paperwork, also advised me to go directly to the MRE in Bogotá.

I was a little wary (and worried) since, this being Colombia, there are often huge differences between theory and practice.

Again, thanks for sharing your very useful experience!

Posted on January 7, 2010


You are very welcome! Glad the info is useful for you.

Posted on January 7, 2010


I'm just leaving mine as hogar. It's actually BAD news because they used to change it for you for FREE!! Now they're charging $40 :P

Posted on January 7, 2010


yeah, but once it is changed, it never has to be changed again. For me, I would much rather pay the $40 than travel back and forth to Bogota every time I change activities and go through the hassle of all the paperwork. And I am pretty sure the $40 is less of a payment then the trouble you could get into if you don't change it and still carry out one of these activities.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Philly, My story is that I arrived here in Sept 2007, got my first marriage visa (visa conjugal) in Oct 2007, and was thus going to renew it in November 2009, but with the birth of my baby in November I was able to wait for the birth and after that apply for a residency visa which I took out at the start of December. I needed

1. Photocopy of my passport and the original passport
2. 2 Photos 3 x 3 white background
3. Copy of the baby's birth certificate (authenticated)
4. Photocopy (authenticated) of the mother's cedula
5. Letter from the mother (authenticated) stating that the child is economically dependent on you
6. If self employed or contractor then bring supporting documentation from the Camara de Comercio

Also to those who do not want to change their visa, a word of warnign...my first visa had me as hogar, I had just arrived in the country and the plan was to take it easy for a few months, then in Jan 2009 I entered into a business, unfortunately however I didn't inform the MRE/DAS so when I went to renew my visa (and requested a change from hogar to independiente,) my support documentation from Camara de Comercio showed that I had entered into a company without informing the MRE/DAS (You have 15 days) so I had to go to the DAS and pay a fine, half a minimum salary.

Hope this helps

Posted on January 7, 2010


Be careful Philly. When I was there in September I asked for the requirements for a residence visa and was told the paperwork needed would be changing in about 3 months (end of the year). Sounds like Noelito provided the old needed paperwork. Not sure what changes were made but make sure you call or email the MRE before you go.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Yes indeed Adrienne! The new Decreto 2622 was voted at the end of August 2009, and it would take a few months for it to filter down not only to the MRE, but also to the Colombian consulates abroad.

As you wrote, the MRE in Bogotá remains the safest bet right now. Most consulates abroad still remain hopelessly behind this new law.

And an important change of this law is that you can now do all this paperwork from WITHIN Colombia (prior to Decreto 2622), you had to be OUTSIDE Colombia to request a visa or a change of visa.

Thus, just enter Colombia on a "tourist" visa, then you get180 days to change your status in Bogotá. No more conflicting advice from Colombian consulates abroad. Get things done straight from the horse's mouth: The MRE in Bogotá.

Posted on January 7, 2010


When I went at the start of December they said that a new form was imminent (even if the staff couldn't give me a definite date) but they didn't give me any indication that the documents required had changed?

Posted on January 7, 2010


Adrienne
do you have a link to the information you posted i need my new employer to see it for himself as this info might save me a trip to Bogota again.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Nope, no link, Vic you still have to go and get the visa changed to state that you can work at "todos" and pay $40 usd. If you already have that, just show your employer your visa and that should be fine. The info I posted was from experience and from an email they sent me, that I got too late to be of any help for me. Hoping it helps you out. The new employer isn't going to have to provide you with anything. Congrats on the new job. I know you were ready for a change.

Posted on January 7, 2010


Hello,
I made the dreaded trip to Bogota to get my Visa. I have to admit,the experience was not as bad as I anticapated. First, a little background information. I have a Padre de hija Colombiana Visa. Basically, I claim to be the father of an Colombiana and I accept the financial responsibility. This visa can be good for 2 or 3 years, I was given 2. In addition with this visa, with the proper paper work, you can work.
I arrived at the MRE around 6 am, it was my mission to be first and I was. I got my little visitors pass and proceeded up to the 2nd floor. I pass through the doors to be greeted by a huge black man. I took my little ticket and sat down. I was called within a minute. My goal was to get my residency, according to a poster above, I should be qualified. Okay, I gave them all my paper work. The same exact paper work I gave them for my other visa without the work papers. I was informed the previous day that I would not need anything from my employer. After watching about 50 receiving their visa before me, I finally received my Resident Visa about 11:30 am. Now, I am entitled to work without all the paperwork that was required before. My Visa does not have a date of exp.
I am actually at the airport typing this so if I have any spelling errors, please excuse me because my flight is getting ready to leave.(oh, there had to be around 200 people or more)
.
1. Photocopy of my passport and the original passport
2. 2 Photos 3 x 3 white background
3. Copy of the baby's birth certificate (authenticated)
4. Photocopy (authenticated) of the mother's cedula
5. Letter from the mother (authenticated) stating that the child is economically dependent on you
6. Copy of my cedula

Posted on January 7, 2010


Oh, the most important part. It cost a whopping $300.

Posted on January 7, 2010


congratulations Philly and thanks

Posted on January 7, 2010


yea...congrats philly!...

Posted on January 7, 2010