Hello friends and fellow ML groupies! :)



I was just wondering how much of the following music is played in dance clubs in Colombia:



Salsa

Merengue

Bachata



Let's say, in an hour at a latin dance club, how much of each .... and cumbia or whatever ... would be played?



Does it very if you are in the capital or on the coast?



Thanks so much! Muchisimas gracias a todos! A Zagarise tambien!! XXX La Reina

Posted on December 3, 2004


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Comments:

bueno......... there is a mix of everything. if for example u go clubbin on the coasts u r gonna find a mix of everything. vallenato, salsa, cumbia, mapale, trans, champeta, reggaeton. about the clubs in the capital mijita i have no idea!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted on December 3, 2004


BACHATA But do they play BACHATA?



1)

If so, where and how much?



2)

Am I mad to expect to hear any Bachata there? YES YES, I know it is from the D.R.



3)

How do you dance to:

vallenato

mapale

champeta



MIL GRACIAS!

Posted on December 3, 2004


lol, ur welcome. they don't play bachata because that's 4rom D.R. bachata is like vallenato but a little bit despacio u kno.. and the way u dance to vallenato is getiing closer with ur partner ur right hand hav to be on your partner's neck and your left hand hav to be on his caderas, and then u move two steps to one side, and two other steps to the other side. then u turn around keep on doin the same thing. as u go with the rythm u may do a little curve. lol.

now the way u dance to mapale is: get on your knees, and put your head down. as the music starts playing u start to raising up yourself, and your lift up in the air your hands and shake ypurself a lot. then u start doing the breakin dance i guess i don't know how to explain it.

and finally champeta is like reggaeton but instead of puertican rythm is colombian rythm. start dancin very close w/ ur partner and and then start goin low....................... lol

Posted on December 3, 2004


Champeta is actually an import from Africa, the basic tempo and style of intrumentation as well as the singing, it has just been adapted to Spanish and Colombian subjects. Reggaeton is impoted dancehall from JA adapted to PR.



Whatever they are I like them both, although only the music, the lyrics are a bit on the silly side.

Posted on December 3, 2004


I hope to find someplace in usa where i can dance I must come in Usa to work, every body told me that in Usa there is no violence, When i am sad i dance, it is true poorbuthappy, why my country is poor and Usa is rich???is Mariangela american, i am very cute i can get married with u and if I get married with u I have no problem to work in Usa

Posted on December 3, 2004


BACHATA They do play all the music you mentioned including BACHATA, but you will have to say in which City.



Some clubs play house music, rap, while others play more

Merengue etc etc.



I was in a club with a friend who had lived in in the DR for 5 years and they started playing BACHATA, but he said the people didn't know how to dance to it properly in Colombia.



Hunter

Posted on December 3, 2004


Killer, hunter, kernow THANK YOU so much - -this is very informative - now I understand more about the way that my Colombian friends dance here in the USA. I would love to study dance in Colombia - it seems there were/are so many influences - and genres! What a beautiful culture! besitos a todos mis amigos alli -- la reina xxx

Posted on December 3, 2004


Thank you BUT ... Elmo, I've already had that flavor "Costeno." Thank you. I prefer Tabasco sauce - it doesn't try to get your chiquit* on the first date, as YOU put it! besitos, la reina

Posted on December 3, 2004


A Costeno tried to get your chiquito on the first date? Wow, que hombre! No wonder you're taking the 5th!

Posted on December 3, 2004


NO NO NO! I was saying that ELMO said that a Costeno would try to get the chiquito as soon as he could, that is all. Sigh.



Of course he did not get it on the first date - what do you think this is ? Seven-Eleven? McDonalds?



besos!

Posted on December 3, 2004


Great thread. I hope you don't mind that I've gone discovering into old threads. I'm still kind of new and thought it'd be better to just add my question to the bottom of an old post than to start a new thread. So anyway, I've taken about 7 or 8 salsa lessons here in Tokyo. I have learned a few steps but am basically still a rank beginner. I'm not sure what salsa dancing is supposed to look like but I don't think I've seen it yet; I've watched the advanced classes and they know lots of moves but they're so serious and mechanical. It's as as they are at work or something. I'll be in Colombia soon and being a tall, white, middle-aged (44 is middle-aged, isn't it?) self-conscious dork of a dancer, was wondering how to make the transition from riding a bar stool and feeling like a loser to being out there on the dance floor having fun without bruising anyone's toes. Do you have to know what you are doing or do you just ask someone to dance and fake it till you make it?

Posted on December 3, 2004


You should be ok Having a few lessons under your belt won't hurt, either. Excepting those who are advanced salseros, the styles vary, depending on where you are. I can dance on the 1 or the 2, and have a little experience with the Cuban style, but when in Colombia, I try to pick up on the style my partner is comfortable with, and go with that. After a couple of cuba libres, both your dancing as well as your Spanish will improve. (at least in your own mind!)

Posted on December 3, 2004


thanks Miguel. I'll be traveling alone. Is it common to just ask a woman you don't know to dance? Or do they go in groups and stick together? What would be a nice friendly city to start out in, this being my first trip to Colombia?

Posted on December 3, 2004


the nice, friendly city would be, of course, Cali.

Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


or cartagena... where the arepas are yellow..

and the girls are brown...

as to the salsa, weather it looks like theirs,

or the chicken dance,square dance, or polka,

just get out there with a smile, and they will love you.



desi.. where is my delicately poached salmon arepa?

Posted on December 3, 2004


you can keep your oil-dripping yellow arepas. My grilled teryaki-marinated salmon steaks were perfect, with just the right amount of gingerroot, lemongrass and mushroom soy. We like to eat healthy.



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


Salmon Should be used for ceviche...hehehe

Posted on December 3, 2004


that actually is a classic.. solo falta un gota salsa cucaracha......



desi...you must know someone that knows someone

in cartagena...let them set you straight on arepas.



shalom

Posted on December 3, 2004


where do these ideas come from... salmon may be sashimi,

but never ceviche,..that is corvina...

Posted on December 3, 2004


This idea came from A coonass that only had Salmon for his ceviche recipe.

Posted on December 3, 2004


I agree salmon would make great ceviche. I'll test it replacing corvina or some other fish with salmon. We might have to invent a new name for it, though.



About Cartagena: no, I've never been in Cartagena. I don't know anybody from there, either. Some day I'll mend that hole in my education.

Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


It goes fast at my parties I cut the off color (grey) strip of flesh out and slice it thin in fairly larg slabs for my friends that like ceviche. I slice it against the grain so it falls apart at the natural grain and add a little Italian olive mix to it and set in next to ceviche for my non ceviche eating friends. Then laugh my ass off ass they gobble it down professing that they would never eat the cheviche...

Posted on December 3, 2004


Oldgringo...what is in the name I few years back after an adult case of chicken pox I went to the doctor because I had all these little round itchy spots. She promptly diagnosed guttate psoriasis. I felt so much better. The looked it up. Guttate psoriasis means...little round itchy spots.



My Japenese aupair was horrified that I didn't use some special three hundred dollar knife to prepare it either.

Posted on December 3, 2004


okay.... you can do anything you want with your food..



and the grey strip is the fat between the flesh and the skin,

the part that is most full of omega 3's.

slice that off for your friends,roll it around in a pan

with some garlic for a minute,..and be healthy. enjoy.

Posted on December 3, 2004


ipdiver guttate comes fom gota...a little drop.

Posted on December 3, 2004


precisely The psoriasis looks like you were hit with raindrops of psoriasis. But a doctor can't say gee you have some itchy round spots try this creme. Fifty bucks please.

Posted on December 3, 2004


try this.. rub some salmon skin on your skin.

Posted on December 3, 2004


and as to cooking..try this desi... drunken salmon...



let the salmon filet sleep overnite in a bath of

johnny walker blue, brown sugar, and montreal steak spice.

next day, wrap in tinfoil and place on the barbie for 15 min.

the oldgringo would love to hear your delicate description

of the delicate results,of this "delicate" presentation.

Posted on December 3, 2004


Bachata On the clubs/discos I visited while in Cali, not one of them played Bachata & the merengue was not the one heard @ clubs in NYC, the "real" merengue rico. It was more like suave merengue &/or the commercialized one. Plenty of Salsa, regueton & "vallejarto" (a few girls said that, not me!) for your body though

Posted on December 3, 2004


2 more marinades marinate in tequila and lemon pepper, maybe some lemon grass. next day add some lemon slices and grill



marinate in white wine and herbs de provençe, dust with white pepper.



these work well with trout too.

Posted on December 3, 2004


interesting... old gringo, but I don't think so. Too dominating flavors for salmon, methinks. But I'll try that white wine variety described by lionheart.

Earlier you (oldgringo) said that dill was just for pickles. We have a tradtional sauce/dressing for salmon made with creme freche with dill. Absolutely delicate! Especially good with broiled salmon.



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


dill sauce I remember the dill sauce very well from Scandinavia, but I thought they used sour cream instead of creme freche. I love to use dill in general for trout and salmon, I just add some lemon pepper, done.

Posted on December 3, 2004


yes, you're right lionheart. To be more accurate, we use a national variety called gräddfil. It's milder than sour cream and closer to creme freche in flavor. Dill is a great complement to salmon/trout dishes.

Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


dill...white sauce...whitewine... do we know the word espantoso...



in scandinavia they love pig fat too.

Posted on December 3, 2004


white sauce At least it is better than dumping mayonnaise on everything, which I read here as a Colombian tradition.



I think of the dill sauce to be the Skandinavian version of tartar sauce for fish.

Posted on December 3, 2004


love the recipes keep 'em coming!

Posted on December 3, 2004


And I thought this was a web site about Colombia Anyway, does anyone have a simple and straightforward way to make Poached salmon?



By the way, Good afternoon (Good evening to Desi) to one and all.

Posted on December 3, 2004


for you queeenie.. busca down and enjoy a real arepa con huevo..

Posted on December 3, 2004


oyoyoy... gomezman....why would you want to?



simple......put it in a little boiling water,cover,..

and ruin it.

Posted on December 3, 2004


well hello gomezman and reina too,

we're pretty much back to the basics here today(tonight for me). Who takes a dump where, who has sex with whom or what, what we put on our plates.

Lionheart will give the best recipe for poached salmon, I'm sure:)

Oldgringo's recipes are far too mysterious for my simple tastes. Adri would certainly know some great recipes for Pacific salmon, but she's been absent for a long time from the board.



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


you should see.. the oldgringo dance champeta..

it's half-way between swaying and schtupping,4/4 time.

Posted on December 3, 2004


salmon/trout fishing in south america This sort of brings the thread back to Colombia. I recall reading questions about fishing in Colombia. From what I understood is that most sweet water fishing is bad, no more fish, or the waters are in dangerous areas.



For those who "need" to go fishing I would recommend Chile, as well as for those needing nature, but are afraid of venturing out into the nature of Colombia. Chile is regarded as one of the most safest countries on this planet. It is a fisher's paradise, they even know fly fishing!

Chile Travels

Posted on December 3, 2004


Hi Desi--how are you? You have always been knows as to the person the to consult regarding recipies. Colombian, Sweedish, American, who knows maybe thai too.

Anyway, I'm in a Wi-Fi cafe talking and eating...so that may be why I'm a little slow at responding

Posted on December 3, 2004


Lionheart..Desi has deffered to you ... A poached Salmon recipe???

Something beyond what old gringo is offering me

Posted on December 3, 2004


gomezman.. seriously,..please,sir, please...

tell us why you would want to poach a salmon??

all lionheart or desi can do is tell you to put some stuff in the water,ruin the fish, then cover it in sauce.



have you ever tasted what thais do to salmon?....destroy!!

and the oldgringo loves and adopts many thai ingredients and methods.

they have to stick to their own fish.



estimado senor,doctor,whatever...please tell me why???

Posted on December 3, 2004


gomezman I'm pretty much into Thai recipes now. They remind me a bit of the Colombian cooking, with the coconut, lemongrass and lime seasonings.

Enloy your meal and your company!



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


Desi, where in gods name did you ... learn to become so versatile...You should makes your way back to Chicago some time before the next century, we have a huge Thai community and some great authentic Thai restaurants.....But you say Thai food is like Colombian food. I don't know about that. Authentic Thai food is some of the hottest food out there. Colombians generally have an aversion to hot food. Thai people eat more hot food than any eithnic people I know.



Actually the lemon grass stuff is eaten more by the Vietnamese than the Thai people. We have a huge Vietnamese Community here as well.

Posted on December 3, 2004


you're getting closer... to finding the source of salsa cucaracha!!!

Posted on December 3, 2004


I have a true aversion to cucarachas. Ever since my neighbor lady's maid recommended a remedy of agua de cucarachas (boiled and strained) as a remedy for my babies when they had the sniffles, even the mention of cucarachas makes my stomach turn.



Gomezman, Thai food is really popular in Sweden right now. Of course, it's adapted to local tastes and thus, not very hot. I find the similarity in the use of coconut and other tropical ingredients in their cuisine. I think Colombians good learn a bit about how to use the wealth of native fruits and vegetables in their cooking from the Oriental people.

Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


Cocina Fusion What you are taking Desi is called in Colombia cocina fusion, and basically is using Oriental cooking together with local ingredients. Very popular in large cities here. Thai has been fashion for some time now in Bogota, at one point the most exclusive restaurant was a Thai one (H. Sasson) but now Cocina fusion is the fashion for hyp restaurants. Even Cali is now catching up.

Posted on December 3, 2004


poached fish In general you never boil fish unless you want to make fish stock. You poach fish only in a court-boullion for a short time. This recipe goes for all fish. I am not a fan of poached salmon, but it is a good way to prepare the cheaper bland salmon types, like for a salad etc.



Court boillion is a mix of water with red/white wine, or vinegar with scraped carrots, minced onions, parsley, thyme, cloves, and pepper. Boil it for a few minutes, then simmer for 15 min. then you are ready to poach.



Save the poaching broth for fish sauces, soups, and chowders, it is excellent.



I prefer poaching with the skin on, adds flavor and essential fats to the broth and the fish while poaching, then I remove the skin. Make sure the broth does not cover the fish. Lay the fillets into the simmering liquid for 15-20 minutes, done. I recommend it for trout and oily fishes, less for salmon.

Posted on December 3, 2004


yes juanalejo that'd be what we call crossover here. I've had this idea for a long time now, and I see that I've tarried too long on these shores while life goes on on the other side of the puddle.

I'd love to see the Colombian cuisine to move away a bit from it's colonial roots, be less Mediterranean and more tropical. In Cali ACPM has been the standard, with heavy, three-course lunches that leave everybody exhausted and ready for a siesta. I'm sure Cali is catching on the trend; they're ever so fast to catch on anything.

The authentic Colombian cuisine is just starting to develop. Sweet-sour has been a no-no in Colombia from times inmemorial. However, other tropical countries have developed their own distinctive cooking based on native ingredients, often combining fruits and meat, locally grown vegetables and herbs and seasonings found in their own gardens.



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


please don't... start with this again...



thai food in thailand....

colombian food in colombia...



they don't translate well...



if you ever go to a restaraunt in thailand

and ask for an arepa con huevo or ajiaco,.

you will be as successful as going into ANY restaurant

in colombia and asking for a yom pla muk or even phad thai ..



and querido desi..how will you everfully embrace the nucleus

of thai cuisine until you overcome your phobia.

i was going to offer to send you one precious gram of the sticky

stuff that they put all over everything in thailand, but now i'm afraid you won't try it.

Posted on December 3, 2004


there is one more thing... the oldgringo does accept and freely import

crosscultural ingredients and methods,on a

trial by fire basis.

the most important ingredient in any food preparation

..........is ...LOVE....

Posted on December 3, 2004


no fusion food please!!!! I have learned to hate it while living in the Seattle area. And California is just as evil. (My heritage is pacific NW)



Self-pronounced master cooks in high price restaurants have turned classic menus into horrible concoctions with weird flavors ... horrible ... and telling all they are creative inventors. It tastes horrible!!!!

Posted on December 3, 2004


the worst thing about fusion restaurants.... is the music.....constant kenny G...



you ever try dancing champeta to that!!

Posted on December 3, 2004


There you all are! I missed the second page of this dicussion.....still not too good.

Anyway...Lionheart, thanks! Sounds quite tasty. The problem is that right now I am only buying the "Fresh Norwegeian salmon (comes from Desi's neck of the woods???)---it's $15.00 @ pound. Supposedly, from all that I read here in Chgo, the "farm raised" salmon is full of carcinogens that should not even be eaten occasionally. But it's cheap..only $8 @ pound. But I love salmon...fish in general.



That reminds me when I went to eat sushi the first time at Hatsuhana en Parque 93 in Bogota......Good grief!!! I ate $93.00 (USD) in sushi. In Chgo, the same would have only been 30-35 USD. I like it so much though, I came back the 2 days later with the same friend ans while I was washing my hands, the waiter asked my friend if I was mafioso. Because I came in twice in 2 days, paid in $$ again & again order about $100 in sushi. My stupid friend told him that I was. Just a side story.

Posted on December 3, 2004


Hatsuhana Well Mr. Gomez we are talking expesive. It is not the sushi it is the restaurant that is expensive. Next time try WOK, it is a chain of Japanese restaurants, you will pay 8 to 10 USD per plate of sushi. 6 to 8 pieces. There are several other Japanese restaurants around town which should run around the same price.

Posted on December 3, 2004


you poor lost souls... obviously,...

the sushi in bogota is similar to the sushi in chicago..

light-years away from the cold pacific....where sushi exists..

the WOK is a broma...



gomezo..you've stated it correctly......"the problem is"



never fear, buck up, pay for a nice filet of that limp

european salmon,(cheaper than poor sushi), and treat it

as if it were a sockeye...

Posted on December 3, 2004


6-8 pieces----you're kidding!! How about 30-35 pieces???

6-8 pieces is appetizer for me. Is Wok the one in Zona Rosa or near Zona Rosa that I never seem to be able to find??



Man, when I eat sushi.....I eat. Here in Chgo, I go to a place where I get all you can eat for $40. I know they loose money. Most people cannot eat anywhere near what I can eat. For that $40, it is first cut sushi...but most people don't eat more than 15 pieces so the restaurant does well. Me?? I eat 40 pieces---without a problem...as long as I have a beer to go with it.

Posted on December 3, 2004


farm-raised is ok, but only occasionally. The taste doesn't differ too much from the wild ones. For salmon teriyaki I can think (just think) using the farm-raised variety, for broiled salmon with creme fraiche sauce only the wild variety. I'd like to be able to buy only the fresh, wild salmo salar (Norwegian fiord lax) but that rich am I not. We eat fish at least twice a week here in Sweden and salmon abounds in the supermmarkets.

I'm not that thrilled over fusion or crossover cooking either. I like simple, well-balanced taste combinations. Not too much, not too little. The natural flavor of first-class, fresh ingredients enhanced with subtle flavorings does the trick for me.

I would love Colombian cuisine develop a character of its own, removed a bit from the pucheros and olla del puerco. With a bit more local flavor, a bit less colonial Spanish.

I don't eat out that often, maybe once a week, but I love to experiment with new recipes.



Oldgringo, maybe if you changed the disgusting name of your special sauce I'd be interested.



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


$40...usa$$ this world is loco...



here at kisha poppo it's all you can eat

for 10 bucks...canadian...pacific coast fresh...

Posted on December 3, 2004


Salmon Most of the salmon we get is Chilean here, not as good as Norwegian but not bad. 10 USD per kg. Yes, that is WOK there are several around Bogota. And maybe I am not much of a conniseur but I do not find it bad at all, it may not be the best for some, but for the price is just fine.

Posted on December 3, 2004


Colombian cuisine I am very surprised about your comments, Desi. I have collected about 500 original old-time recipes of Colombia, all sorted by the region of their origin. By reading them alone they already seem very special, I have tried a few here where I don't have problems with ingredients. I didn't venture towards guinea pigs yet, I doubt the local ones in pet stores are the same. Or do you mean what is being offered in restaurants in general?

Posted on December 3, 2004


senor juanelejo.. all of the salmon is chilean, it is the equivlent of the

north pacific pink salmon, and it comes to you frozen.

i hope senor, that someday you can taste real salmon,

as i have had that chance to taste real colombian barracuda.

Posted on December 3, 2004


All salmon is Chilean??? Oldgringo...where did you get that from???Or are you saying that originaly the species evolved in Chile and went they went to spawn, they continued swimming so far upstream, they hit the Norwegian area, some of them forgot or lost their way back to Chile and stayed in the Norwegian area and hence the name "Norwegian Salmon"?

Posted on December 3, 2004


lionheart I'm not trying to match your expertise on Colombian cuisine. I believe the home-cooking is actually of superior quality than the dishes offered at restaurants in Cali. Colombian cuisine is very delicate (oops, that's the word I tend to overuse, again) and best when eaten when freshly made. Maybe because a lot of it is deep-fried. I was never interested in cooking when I lived in Colombia; I was too busy and had maids who took care of that. I cooked my very first sancocho when I had already moved away from Colombia.

What I'm saying is that I find Colombian cuisine too deeply rooted in the Mediterranean tradition. Lot's of beans, lentils, rice and stews. All good, hearty country fare, which I appreciate. Of course, they do use the local tubers and fruits, but rather in a conservative fashion. Too much oil, for my taste. Too many carbs on the plate at any given time. The best of Colombian home cooking is the hearty, nutritive soups. That's where all the native vegetables are used to their fullest. Fruit juices too, and some desserts, like esponjado de curuba are outstanding.



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


no silly.. he meant all the salmon you see in colombia is imported,

frozen, from chile...duh................

Posted on December 3, 2004


As a person of Colombian heritage...... The biggest problem I have with Colombian cooking, restaurant or home style, is that the diet still is so heavily concentrated in the rice, beans, lentils, yuca, plantains and meat......and not nearly enough veggies in the diet. My american friend in Chgo, really don't like Col cusine much because, they say----"potatoes, rice, and yuca (which almost tastes like a potatoe) and no vegies is not something they can handle....Too much carbs and not enough veggies.

Posted on December 3, 2004


about Chilean salmon I bought fresh, unfrozen fillets of Chilean salmon in a supermarket in Cali, at an exorbitant price. I wanted to cook a special meal for my Cali relatives. I was told that it tasted a lot like róbalo! Good grief, what a waste of money. I thought it was alright, not quite up to par with the Norwegian fiord lax, but much brighter and better than Pacific pink.



Salmon is found in all cold waters, but breeds only in rivers flowing into the sea.



Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


Anyway...I'm getting thrown.... out of this Wi-Fi coffee house....so bye bye...until....later

Posted on December 3, 2004


never did find out ... why that boy wanted to poach a salmon...



and desi come learn about land-locked kokanee salmon..

Posted on December 3, 2004


salmon I have seen fresh salmon in my house also, not sure where it was bought though. But yes I do buy frozen salmon at el Exito. I ask for forgiveness. I have eaten fresh salmon in the UK and Norway, and it is fantastic, but this last holidays I was in London and my friends gave me all this retoric on organic vs non organic salmon. Any thoughts about it? The difference in color was very evident.

Posted on December 3, 2004


juanalejo I don't really know. Could it be farmed and wild? The farmed ones tend to be of brighter color due to the colorants they add in their diet. They're also looser in consistence. Wild-caught is of course of superior quality, but often fairly rare at the supermarkets. The smaller varieties of salmonae (trouts and such) can be fished right out the rivers and lakes in northern Scandinavia, good quality, very tasty, but they have plenty of spines.

Anyway, it's getting late here. G'night to all.

Cheers,

Desi

Posted on December 3, 2004


organic.... hahahahahah...



it means farmed.....



weather or not it is fed according to some set of rules

or not,weather they are enforced or not, weather there is pigmentation added to their food or not,they are all farmed fish

if they are called "organic".

and everyone here knows not to eat farmed fish....

Posted on December 3, 2004


organic smorganic Both are farmed salmon. It just depends on the additives in the water and in the food. I have my doubts about how truely effective it is. In general wild salmon and trout taste better, have a heartier flavor, and firmer flesh, because of all the swimming they have to do. Fish farmers say the wild fish are more likely to pick up stuff from polluted waters. Fresh fish dealers claim all additives make the fish not natural anymore. Sometimes those claiming to be organic will mean that they are wild ones and not farmed ones. That would explain the color difference. Since there are at least 5 distinct varieties of salmon and over a dozen names for salmon and trout each, it is hard to say when comparing store bought fish which is which. Once sliced into fillets you can't really distiguish what is what, only the color and flesh firmness can give you hints. And often color additives are added, as well.



The only true way to tell what your are buying is go to your fish monger, pick a complete salmon, and ask him to fillet it. Then you know what you are getting. Or even better, catch your own, there is nothing better than fresh caught fish!

Posted on December 3, 2004


As simple as it gets Salmon recipe Take your salmon steak and cover it with dijon mustard (pardon me would you happen to have any Grey Poupon comes to mind). Then take a plate and scatter what ever seasoning you like for example basil or dill. Then cook in a hot pan on each side 3-5 minutes. The mustard and spices will turn black and look burnt but the taste is great. I like to cook with several variations of combinations of my favorite spices so I can taste them side by side.

Posted on December 3, 2004


You people are making me hungry!! BTW, I went to a new class today and the teacher was excellent!! Quite a workout.

Posted on December 3, 2004