I noticed that Colombians get a kick out of when I use an idiom correctly, so I want to learn more. Any common idioms you can share?

Here's a couple:

Del dicho al hecho hay mucho trecho: "Easier said than done"
Son uña y carne: "They are very close"
Nos llevamos como perros y gatos: "We get along like dogs and cats"
Echar los perros: "To flirt"

Posted on July 13, 2009


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Comments:

Sacar la piedra: "To piss someone off"

Mas feo/a que una patada en el culo: "Uglier than a kick in the ass"

Instead of 'una y carne'....I use 'una y mugre' (nail and dirt).

Posted on July 13, 2009


"Pelar los dientes" smile

Posted on July 13, 2009


el golpe chacarero.. the nut slapping, for example ella quiere sentir el golpe chacarero

Posted on July 13, 2009


la ultima coca-cola en el desierto - the last coca cola in the desert. Used when someone thinks they are 'all that'

Posted on July 13, 2009


amor de lejos, amor de pendejos

Posted on July 13, 2009


"Mucho tilín, tilín y nada de paletas" = "All talk but no walk"

Posted on July 13, 2009


Amor de lejos, felices los tres...

Posted on July 13, 2009


... o felices los cuatro. :o)

Posted on July 13, 2009


ojos que no ven....

donde hubo fuego....

Posted on July 13, 2009


El que no llora no mama.
Very PBHish!
G'morning America. Lovely, sunny day in Scandinavia.

Posted on July 13, 2009


Moderator: those lists are about useless without english translations :(

Posted on July 13, 2009


You can't translate idioms...not all of them anyway. There are idioms in English that mean the same but in different words.

Posted on July 13, 2009


English equivalents are possible, like in the examples above. Any attempt to translate them word for word would not work

Posted on July 13, 2009


lo que quieren beso busca boca

Posted on July 13, 2009